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Estate Administration

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When a loved one dies it is comforting to know that you have a caring expert on your side to help you navigate the legal and logistical challenges involved in this life transition. I work alongside my clients to gather together the assets of the estate and use them to pay outstanding debts, including taxes, as well as to distribute the assets according to their loved one’s wishes. I work with insurance companies, banks and other financial advisors to coordinate the receipt and distribution of assets. I understand the strain and emotional toll families are under in this type of circumstance and I strive to provide caring, thoughtful and thorough support and service when you most need a trusted advisor.

Frequently Asked Questions

A power of attorney is a document that grants legal rights and powers by one person (called the “principal”) to another person (called the “agent” or “attorney-in-fact”). The agent acts on behalf of the principal for legal, financial and business matters. The agent can do whatever the principal may do, as defined in the power of attorney document, such as withdraw funds from bank accounts, trade stock, pay bills and cash checks.

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Please Note: The information provided here is a summary only and does not take into account your individual situation.

In general, a power of attorney expires if the principal becomes mentally incompetent. However, it is often useful for an individual to be able to appoint someone to act for him or her when the individual is no longer able to make decisions or handle his or her affairs. Therefore Massachusetts law permits individuals to create a “durable” power of attorney which continues in effect after the individual loses competence.

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Please Note: The information provided here is a summary only and does not take into account your individual situation.

No. Only a court can take away a principal’s rights in a conservatorship or guardianship proceeding.

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Please Note: The information provided here is a summary only and does not take into account your individual situation.

Yes. A principal may revoke a power of attorney at any time. All a principal needs to do is send a letter to his or her agent telling them that their appointment has been revoked. From the moment the agent receives the letter, he or she can no longer act under the power of attorney.

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Please Note: The information provided here is a summary only and does not take into account your individual situation.

Depending on the wording of the power of attorney, you may or may not have to act together on all transactions. In most cases, when there are multiple agents they are appointed “severally,” meaning that they can each act independently of one another. Nevertheless, it is important for them to communicate with one another to make certain that their actions are consistent.

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Please Note: The information provided here is a summary only and does not take into account your individual situation.

Yes. The principal may revoke the power of attorney at any time. All he or she needs to do is send the agent a letter to this effect. The appointment of a conservator or guardian does not immediately revoke the power of attorney. But the conservator or guardian, like the principal, has the power to revoke the power of attorney.

Want to discuss your Estate Administration needs? Let’s talk.

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Please Note: The information provided here is a summary only and does not take into account your individual situation.

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Excellent advice – custom tailored to our situation – great interaction/response with our financial planner to clarify a few areas. Consummate professional. You are on my list of favorites from New Jersey – along with Sinatra, Springsteen, Bon Jovi and the Sopranos Sharon and Nick Macone, Melrose, MA

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